Posts Tagged ‘Beveridge & Diamond’

Zimbabwe: Africa Still Debating GMOs Pros and Cons

Provided by Beveridge & Diamond: African governments are skeptical about genetically modified organism (GMO) crops because of food safety, the environment and mistrust of multinationals.

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Kenya: ‘Push-Pull’ Pest Control to Reach More Farmers

Provided by Beveridge & Diamond: “Push-Pull” pest control uses intercropping, the use of plants working in conjunction to keep insect pests from food crops, as a viable alternative to insecticides and pesticides.

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U.S.: SEC Regulations Requiring Disclosure of Conflict Minerals

The U.S. conflict minerals disclosure requirements will trigger a review of many companies’ supply chain management policies to implement the source-of-origin requirements that the use of these materials will trigger.

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Zimbabwe: Experts Carrying Out Research On GMOs

Provided by Beveridge & Diamond: Zimbabwe has not adopted genetic modification technologies on a commercial basis. Experts are conducting research and trials on genetically modified organisms.

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U.S.: President Signs Into Law Conflict Minerals Legislation

Apart from the financial market regulatory reforms, the Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act imposes on many manufacturers new requirements relating to “conflict minerals.”

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Global: United States, European Union, Japan and Canada Conclude Third International Meeting on Cosmetics

The International Cooperation on Cosmetic Regulation (“ICCR”) held its third annual meeting (“ICCR-3”) September 9-11, 2009 in Tokyo, Japan and focused on a number of topics.

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U.S.: APHIS Proposes Definitions for Lacey Act Exemptions

On August 4, 2010, the U.S. Department of Agriculture proposed regulations under the Lacey Act, a statute combatting illegal trafficking in wildlife, fish, and certain plants.

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U.S.: California Becoming the Locus of Carbon Markets

The key to reducing the rates of tropical deforestation is to make the forests more valuable standing than cleared. REDD (reducing emissions from deforestation and degredation) programs, which attempt to put a market value on carbon stored in forests, create economic opportunity within a cap-and-trade program. REDD in California is alive and well; the state’s economy-wide cap-and-trade program is scheduled to go into effect on January 1, 2012.

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